These pictures were taken during our last field trip. We surveyed 13 lakes between Fairbanks and the Kenai Peninsula. I really like field work, and in general the whole process of getting, analyzing and mapping data. (I’m looking for my PhD-Charming..)

 

Step 1: transporting gear and walking around to find potential hotspots

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Step 2: Outlining the transect…and shoveling!! (actually we love shoveling, it keeps us warm)

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Step 3: Sweeping (we dont want any powder on the ice, it might freeze and create crusty ice when we pour water afterwards)

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Step 4: Opening a hole (we need water for the bubble survey and for the depth survey)

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    Tadaaaa! The ice Master, her Ice Gemm and a nice transect

Step 5: Pouring water, quantifying methane on the transect

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  Measuring water depth, taking sediment samples

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Measuring water depth along the transect with a depth finder, and a conference au sommet  trying to understand the weird shapes of methane bubbles we just found

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Proud scientist. Freezing scientist.  (l’un n’empeche pas l’autre)

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Walking to the next transect

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Break. And loading again

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       …et comparer nos blessures de guerre

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